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Author Topic: First run on the Roadsmart 3  (Read 3025 times)

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#10

Offline JTL

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Re: First run on the Roadsmart 3
Reply #10 on: April 01, 2021, 06:42:43 PM
I'm still liking the Roadtec 01 SE.  4000 miles and still feel good.

#11

Online Low-Brau

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Re: First run on the Roadsmart 3
Reply #11 on: April 06, 2021, 11:53:45 PM



I'm 20 miles into the break in on the Roadsmart 4s now... I hate scrubbing in new tires.  The good news is that I haven't crashed yet!  :152:
-Erik

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  -- zbdmark

#12

Offline runnerhiker

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Re: First run on the Roadsmart 3
Reply #12 on: April 07, 2021, 04:14:40 AM
*Originally Posted by Low-Brau [+]


I'm 20 miles into the break in on the Roadsmart 4s now... I hate scrubbing in new tires.  The good news is that I haven't crashed yet!  :152:
I never understood the concept of scrubbing in a new tire.  The very first time you lean the bike over at, lets say 25 degrees, the tire is unscrubbed at 25 deg, but you don't fall the first time you do that.  And the lateral forces are balanced so you don't need 26 deg and you don't need 24 deg of lean.  And that is true for any point on the chicken strips for the first time you ever lean over at that point.

What am I missing?

#13

Offline JerryG

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Re: First run on the Roadsmart 3
Reply #13 on: April 07, 2021, 07:48:32 AM
Back in 1984, I had a fresh set of tires on my R100/7. After a just hundred feet or so, as I drove away from the shop, a pedestrian crossed the street in front of me; completing forgetting the mechanic's warning about new tires, I did an abrupt swerve to avoid the pedestrian. Avoid them I did, but I still remember the sick sinking feeling as my front tire slid sideways on the pavement during that swerve. I didn't crash, but I came damn close; I never did that again. Back then, it was mostly about baking off the mold release agent used during manufacturing; these days, it's more about getting the tire to operating temperature to leech out residual oils and chemicals and for optimal traction.  Here's a good concise article on this...

Source: https://www.bikebandit.com/blog/how-to-properly-breaking-in-motorcycle-tires ...

"There’s something exciting about getting new tires on your motorcycle that makes you want to get out and push the limits of that fresh rubber. As soon as tires get mounted, motorcycle owners jump aboard and are ready to hit the twisty roads, but forget one simple, yet important fact. Motorcycle tires need to be properly broken in before you start riding too aggressively. In some cases, even the most basic corner can be a wipeout waiting to happen. You might be wondering what makes a brand new tire so much of a hazard, since we’ve always been under the impression that new means better. Well, it’s not so much of an issue with the tire, but more of an error on the rider’s part because they’ve either been misinformed or not informed at all.

Years ago it was common for tire manufacturers to use chemical release agents to help get tires out of the molds that resulted in slick tire surfaces causing untimely falls. Most manufacturers now only use a release agent on the sidewalls of the tires to ensure that all of the manufacturing numbers, text and company logos come out of the mold flawless. This is very similar to a baker greasing a cake pan to ensure that it slides out with little to no effort without causing any imperfections to the final product. This doesn’t mean that you’re out of the woods with new tires, because there are still plenty of oils and other chemicals in the rubber compound that need to be released in order to get the maximum traction out of your tires.

When you purchase a new set of tires, one of the most important things you can do is to bring them up to a safe operating temperature as well as running the tires with the proper inflation. Pirelli, a leader in sport bike tire manufacturing, recommends that you warm your tires up to 165-degrees for at least 10-minutes before pushing the performance of the tires. Why? For the sole purpose of bringing the tires up to temperature and allowing them to get warm enough to leech out oils and chemicals that can make them slick. For track guys this is fairly easy to do with a set of tire warmers, but in all reality that is probably less than 1-5% of everyone reading this. Most of you are casual street riders that like to let loose on the weekends, and it’s not likely that you’ll be carrying around a temp gun to check your tire temperature. A safe rule of thumb is that 20 minutes of hard riding should bring your tires up to the proper operating temperatures. Making sure that your tire pressures are properly set to the manufacturers specifications are equally as important.

This might have you wondering why all of those racers do that weave and wobble on their bikes when they put a fresh set of tires on their bikes. Surely that has to help warm the tires up or at least scrub the surface to improve your traction right? Wrong. Weaving back and forth minimally increases the temperature of the tires, but does put you at greater risk of going down by depending on cornering grip from cold tires. Additionally those riders have had warmers on their tires to bring them up to temperature, and even then it still takes them about two laps on the track to get up to maximum performance temperature. For the casual rider it is best recommended to use strong acceleration and braking forces while upright and not leaned over, to generate heat in the tire carcass. This heat then transfers to the tread compound increasing your overall grip once up to proper operating temperatures during the break in process. Even after the tires are broken in, this is a procedure we’d recommend when you get back on the road to make you’re riding with the maximum amount of grip every time.

Ultimately the point we want to get across is that after you get that fresh set of rubber mounted to your wheels, take the time cruise around town and get your tires broken in properly. By following the above steps, you’ll get the best performance out of your tires and potentially avoid an expensive mishap of going down. If you’re still shopping around for that perfect set of tires to mount on your motorcycle, be sure to check out our massive tire selection. We’re the best in the industry with our great inventory and pricing, so don’t miss out on spectacular deals."

#14

Offline Mareng1

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Re: First run on the Roadsmart 3
Reply #14 on: April 07, 2021, 08:42:50 AM
*Originally Posted by runnerhiker [+]
I never understood the concept of scrubbing in a new tire.  The very first time you lean the bike over at, lets say 25 degrees, the tire is unscrubbed at 25 deg, but you don't fall the first time you do that.  And the lateral forces are balanced so you don't need 26 deg and you don't need 24 deg of lean.  And that is true for any point on the chicken strips for the first time you ever lean over at that point.

What am I missing?

The first time you reach 25deg, you are probably using 80% of the scrubbed patch at 23deg, with 20% ‘new’ patch.

I think the problem occurs when you lean a 25deg scrubbed tyre to 40deg on the next bend, and are using 90% new patch.

Above figs are just representative, not meant to be forensically-dissected.


#15

Offline runnerhiker

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Re: First run on the Roadsmart 3
Reply #15 on: April 07, 2021, 11:20:56 AM
*Originally Posted by Mareng1 [+]
The first time you reach 25deg, you are probably using 80% of the scrubbed patch at 23deg, with 20% ‘new’ patch.

I think the problem occurs when you lean a 25deg scrubbed tyre to 40deg on the next bend, and are using 90% new patch.

Above figs are just representative, not meant to be forensically-dissected.
There is going to be a "first" time for every little increment of "new" patch.  And we don't fall off this "first" time.

#16

Online Low-Brau

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Re: First run on the Roadsmart 3
Reply #16 on: April 07, 2021, 12:17:54 PM
*Originally Posted by runnerhiker [+]
I never understood the concept of scrubbing in a new tire.  The very first time you lean the bike over at, lets say 25 degrees, the tire is unscrubbed at 25 deg, but you don't fall the first time you do that.  And the lateral forces are balanced so you don't need 26 deg and you don't need 24 deg of lean.  And that is true for any point on the chicken strips for the first time you ever lean over at that point.

What am I missing?

I was driving my brand new XR home from the dealer a few years ago. They warned me about breaking in the new tires; to drive the first 100 miles like it was raining. The tires need to warm up for the leeching to occur.

With a total of 33 miles on my brand new XR, I leaned into a turn at 20mph and low sided.

$7,000 later, and 6 weeks of waiting for parts to arrive from Germany, my XR was restored.

My helmet was destroyed, my riding gloves scrubbed through, and my knee felt the brunt of the crash and the left side of my face the remainder. Thank goodness I had knee armor and a full faced helmet.

All that at 20mph.   

I will forever scrub tires in carefully. I’ve learned that lesson.  :012:
Last Edit: April 07, 2021, 12:20:18 PM by Low-Brau
-Erik

"...but the XR is a sports bike on stilts!"
  -- zbdmark

#17

Offline Mareng1

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Re: First run on the Roadsmart 3
Reply #17 on: April 07, 2021, 01:05:08 PM
*Originally Posted by runnerhiker [+]
There is going to be a "first" time for every little increment of "new" patch.  And we don't fall off this "first" time.

From 0deg to 15deg there is very little centrifugal force to break grip, that force increases of course until you are subjecting a significant patch of 'new' rubber to significant centrifugal force -

As you get towards significant lean angles the more 'new' patch you are loading up - the more likely you are to break grip.

SO- when you get beyond (15deg) - you start to do incremental increases rather than going straight for another 15deg.

(above angles are for illustration)





Last Edit: April 07, 2021, 01:11:40 PM by Mareng1

#18

Offline Mareng1

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Re: First run on the Roadsmart 3
Reply #18 on: April 07, 2021, 01:09:14 PM
*Originally Posted by Low-Brau [+]
I was driving my brand new XR home from the dealer a few years ago. They warned me about breaking in the new tires; to drive the first 100 miles like it was raining. The tires need to warm up for the leeching to occur.

A local bike workshop owner told me:  "I always advise riders to take it easy until the tyres are scrubbed in"

One hero retorted with:  "They'll be scrubbed in by the end of the carpark, mate!"   - got to the end of the carpark, and binned the bike.

Since then - if a 'hero' comes back with a smart response - he adds:  "Hang on - I'll go get my dustpan and brush". :745:

#19

Online Low-Brau

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Re: First run on the Roadsmart 3
Reply #19 on: April 07, 2021, 01:18:25 PM
 :047:

Brilliant.
-Erik

"...but the XR is a sports bike on stilts!"
  -- zbdmark

 



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