Author Electric Motorcycles  (Read 2606 times)

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  • Offline Winger   gb

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    Offline Winger

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    Electric Motorcycles
    on: July 12, 2021, 04:57:38 pm
    July 12, 2021, 04:57:38 pm
    Begging of Covid lock down both my wife and I swapped out conventional mountain bikes for electric, hers being a Cube 160 and mine a Turbo Levo, must have done close on a couple of thousand miles in the last 18 months and they have been a revelation, fast forward too this weeks MCN where I see Zero electric are doing a UK tour of dealers giving demo rides and good old HD have started a separate company ‘Live Wire’ which bike wise  from a personal point of view looks reasonable, and while range wise have a way to go so has the price they are future like or not, but would interesting to hear from luddites  :001:

  • Offline Antares   gb

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    Re: Electric Motorcycles
    Reply #1 on: July 12, 2021, 05:58:02 pm
    July 12, 2021, 05:58:02 pm
    *Originally Posted by Winger [+]
    Begging of Covid lock down both my wife and I swapped out conventional mountain bikes for electric, hers being a Cube 160 and mine a Turbo Levo, must have done close on a couple of thousand miles in the last 18 months and they have been a revelation, fast forward too this weeks MCN where I see Zero electric are doing a UK tour of dealers giving demo rides and good old HD have started a separate company ‘Live Wire’ which bike wise  from a personal point of view looks reasonable, and while range wise have a way to go so has the price they are future like or not, but would interesting to hear from luddites  :001:

    Most can do a 100 miles now on the motorway, more elsewhere, not much worse than an R1 or MT09 lol

  • Online wessie   gb

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    Re: Electric Motorcycles
    Reply #2 on: July 12, 2021, 08:48:53 pm
    July 12, 2021, 08:48:53 pm
    real world review on UKRM from a regular poster of my acquaintance posted today. He bought a used Energica Esse Esse 9 and has done 1000 miles of mostly commuting
    https://groups.google.com/g/uk.rec.motorcycles/c/Um9ETsqAAEY

    Erk, this is longer than I thought.

    So far, so good. Range on a roughly 36 mile round-trip commute, riding
    on A roads and dual-carriageways at my usual commuting speed is fine;
    I get home with something like 45% charge remaining. Riding it harder
    than I'd usually ride the Guzzi gets the remaining charge down to
    around 40%.

    Last Thursday and Friday, I tried to wring two commutes out of one
    charge. This wasn't the best of times to do this: I've found that the
    bike charges to 100% but if left for a couple of days unused (still
    plugged in), the charge level drops to 98%. I hadn't used it for a day
    or two, so started from 98%.

    I commuted on the first day at maybe a couple of mph under the speed
    limits. The second day I was creeping home at 125 learner-bike speeds,
    grateful for the Newmarket races 40 limit and slower traffic. The A11
    coming home was a dull trundle, with cars whizzing past. I definitely
    suffered range anxiety: it's not as though I could get a 'Er Ladyship
    to nip out with a can of electricity. I got home with 5% charge left.

    Overall, it has a range of roughly 75 miles of open roads if ridden
    like a 125cc commuter. I'm still not certain whether the longer,
    slower, back roads route uses more or less charge than the faster but
    shorter route that includes straight A roads and dual-carriageway.

    Power-wise, it pulls like a train from low revs when the battery is
    fully charged, but loses its sparkle by about 50%. At low charge,
    well, it does accelerate, but that's all that can be said.

    A typical recharge from a single commute at normal speeds takes around
    three and a half to four hours, including time spent balancing the
    cells. The bike rather optimistically estimates around two and a half
    hours. One thing I've found is that the battery charge level at the
    end of the working day is higher than when I arrived at work by about
    3-5% of maximum charge: the battery seems to recover a bit.

    I initially tried the stock suspension settings and found the rear
    woefully underdamped. Oddly though, I can feel pretty much the entire
    road surface. Not sure whether this is to do with the relatively
    budget suspension itself or the lack of engine vibration to mask it
    [update: I've juse watched episode 1 of Long Way Up: Ewan Mcgregor
    made the same observation, riding a different bike, so that settles
    it]. it rides undulating roads well, but sharp irregularities
    (potholes, tarmac changes etc) can be very jarring. Added to this, the
    rear number plate bracket vibrates on these bumps, which adds a sort
    of thrum to the kick, a little like the haptic feedback you get from
    mobiles.

    The preceding owner had wound the rear rebound up to maximum, and I
    ended up doing the same. It could do with a little more, to be honest.
    I have also roughly set up the rear static sag for my weight /
    preference. Strictly, the spring probably needs changing, but if I did
    splash out then it'd be for a whole shock.

    The front is OK, with compression adjustment on one leg and rebound on
    the other, same as the Guzzi (but this time with USD forks). The front
    has a lot of stiction: I've dicked with it and I think it has improved
    a bit, but there's more than I'd expect. I also fitted a cable tie to
    one fork leg as the old racer's tell-tale, and from the indicated "low
    water mark", reduced the preload to lower the front a bit and dicked a
    little with the damping. Not sure that has made a huge difference,
    TBH. It might lighten the steering a tad, but maybe I've simply got
    used to it. It does feel slightly less stable on bumpy bends but not
    worryingly so.

    I've fitted a Tutoro chain lube system, which is purely mechanical.
    There's no way I'm tapping into the electrical system while the bike's
    under warranty and of course there's no vacuum to tap into. The oiler
    came as a very comprehensive kit with super-clear instructions and
    just works. Very impressed.

    What else? The speedo is about 10% optimistic at 20mph at least
    (according to those village speed signs), and the trip meter reads
    about 1 mile further to work than the Guzzi does, so I suspect it's on
    the limit wrt acceptable accuracy. I also suspect that the
    elecronically limited top speed gets its readings from the same
    source, so 116 is probably more realistic.

    Any other quirks? I have inadvertently flicked the kill switch off
    while reaching for the rather poorly-placed cruise button a couple of
    times.

    If the battery is fully charged, there no regeneratve "engine braking"
    for the first half mile or so, which nearly caught me out once. On the
    subject of engine braking, the regeneration braking force remains
    constant regardless of speed, whereas for an IC bike one would tend to
    be in a higher gear at higher speeds, so less braking. Just turning
    off cruise control at speed, for example, has the bike slow very
    abruptly, so care has to be taken with the throttle. I reckon a more
    speed-related proportional control would be better.

    Trivial stuff: the dash switches between bright and low-light modes
    rather abruptly, which is mildly distracting. There is a satnav, which
    had me thinking "oh, goody!" but it has to link to a phone and only
    helps locate nearby recharging stations. Apparently. I haven't seen it
    work in practice.

    There's a shootout between the Energica EVA and the Zero SRF here:
    . I've ridden both and the
    Zero is (I hate to say it) probably the better bike. But heart won
    over head, and anyway, the Eva was secondhand and a couple of grand
    cheaper than a new Zero. Incidentally, I am wondering whether the
    featured Eva isn't the one that's now sitting in my garage! In the
    review, the bike was ridden from the same dealer I bought mine from.

    There is also a review of the Energica MotoE racer om the web, with
    which I think my bike is related via the Energica Ego. The frame,
    motor and gearbox look very similar, though my suspension is rather
    more budget. Everything else, including battery, look different. It's
    about as close to a Moto<somthing> racer as I'll ever get, probably.

    Am I still enjoying it? yes, very much. It's plenty fast enough for
    open roads, has the range for the bulk of the miles I do, it's
    different, (slightly) greener than other vehicles, and looks pretty
    gorgeous.

    Last Edit: July 12, 2021, 09:05:09 pm by wessie

  • Offline Winger   gb

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    Offline Winger

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    Re: Electric Motorcycles
    Reply #3 on: July 12, 2021, 09:28:46 pm
    July 12, 2021, 09:28:46 pm
    Interesting stuff...having done some digging looks like a big scooter ie BMW at the end of year and others, will also have its merits and at the rate tech is advancing anything looks possible...including renting as opposed to buying.

  • Offline orbits   gb

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    Re: Electric Motorcycles
    Reply #4 on: July 12, 2021, 10:28:48 pm
    July 12, 2021, 10:28:48 pm
    I had a short blast on a Zero SR/F a couple of weeks ago at the ABR festival. Absolute revelation. Ok the range and charging time are still real-world issues for electric bikes (in general) but the performance and grin-factor were absolutely there without question.

    Hugely entertaining and quick with the endless torque/drive on tap. I didn’t overly miss the lack of engine note either. The motor whine coupled with the wind rush made for a different - but not unpleasant - experience (bit like a glider for anyone who’s been in one).

    Anyway, bottom line for me was that if someone left one on my drive I’d be straight out on in for a laugh… once it charged. I’m looking forward to seeing how the electric market evolves.

  • Offline Winger   gb

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    Offline Winger

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    Re: Electric Motorcycles
    Reply #5 on: July 13, 2021, 08:54:55 am
    July 13, 2021, 08:54:55 am
    Looking forward at some time to riding one, I know from our mountain bikes there’s a difference between the Brose motor in mine and the Bosch in my wife’s, interesting looking at various bikes ie the rear shock on Zero...looks like it must have cost all of 20 quid  :001:

  • Offline Belco100   gb

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    Re: Electric Motorcycles
    Reply #6 on: July 13, 2021, 10:37:27 am
    July 13, 2021, 10:37:27 am
    I quite like the look of the LiveWire. I sat on one at the NEC in 2019 where they had it set up on a rolling road, and they have engineered in a pulsing feel so you know when its switched on. The connectivity in the screen tells you charge and connects to your phone to show nearest charging points, all quite neat. But comparing it to their "Bronx" which at the time was going to have their Revolution engine in it with the same Streetfighter type look:

    LiveWire:
    Cost £30,000
    Power around 110hp (I know electric hp does feel quite strong)
    Range 120 mile (slow speed) or 70 in normal mixed type use
    Charging time 1-8hrs depending on what you use

    Bronx:
    Cost £20,000
    Power around 110hp
    Range 140 mile
    Fill up time 5 mins

    Since then the Bronx has been dropped and the LiveWire is now its own brand and I think has had a massive price reduction? 

    I would love to have a go on a LiveWire. It's not quite in the same league as an S1000R/XR but it is similar, but I would find it so annoying to have that much "fun" in it and have to ride at 30mph to try and prolong range - the 70 mile range barley gets me out of Southend and back again without having to stop for an hour to recharge  :033:

    https://www.webbikeworld.com/jesse-dalba-rode-his-harley-davidson-livewire-from-florida-to-the-sturgis-motorcycle-rally/
    Last Edit: July 13, 2021, 11:03:03 am by Belco100

  • Offline orbits   gb

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    Re: Electric Motorcycles
    Reply #7 on: July 13, 2021, 12:14:16 pm
    July 13, 2021, 12:14:16 pm
    *Originally Posted by Winger [+]
    … the rear shock on Zero...looks like it must have cost all of 20 quid  :001:
    Funny you say that, as the only thing I could really mark down in my brief spin was what felt like slightly under controlled suspension at the rear; like it was chattering a bit over smaller high frequency bumps. I also felt a minor vibe which was possibly the toothed drive belt? I’d be tinkering with the shock if I had one (and if it’s tinkerable of course; didn’t check!)

  • Offline sipaldi   england

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    Re: Electric Motorcycles
    Reply #8 on: July 13, 2021, 01:06:34 pm
    July 13, 2021, 01:06:34 pm
       Not ridden one but think I would feel even more vulnerable on a silent motorcycle. I have an outlander PHEV and in electric mode I have had so many people step out in front of me. Amazing really that people will and do trust their hearing alone to cross the road. The outlander gives a hum out at lower speeds which is supposed to warn pedestrians, obviously its not loud enough.  Maybe the electric motorcycles should be supplied with a soundtrack? Food for thought.

      As for performance, the electric vehicles give instant torque so I imagine the motorcycles being capable of ripping arms off!

      Before my PHEV I was suspicious of us all driving and riding electric vehicles but now I would say I actually prefer to drive in electric mode.

  • Offline Winger   gb

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    Offline Winger

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    Re: Electric Motorcycles
    Reply #9 on: July 13, 2021, 06:41:45 pm
    July 13, 2021, 06:41:45 pm
    Yep now there's a thought  :003:

    Interesting reading

    Luxe.digital/lifestyle/cars/best-electric-motorcycles/

    For some reason it won't let me copy it, so some one more savy will have to post a link  :001:
    Last Edit: July 13, 2021, 06:45:58 pm by Winger